Category Archives: History

Know your okonomiyaki

The elusive okonomiyaki (photo by luke chan)

The elusive okonomiyaki (photo by luke chan)

Although one might think it’s suited to the Western palate, okonomiyaki, a dish emblematic of the Osaka region, has never gained the same popularity abroad as ramen. Okonomiyaki is popular in Japan in every sense of the term and its various iterations can be found just about everywhere in Japan. Okonomiyaki which translates as “grill it the way you like it”, seems more a reflection of Western individualism than of Japanese homogeneity. Unsurprisingly, its history, preparation and regional style are far from being clearly defined. Where does it come from? How do you make the dish? What are the different types of local variations?

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What in the world is shochu?

佐藤

Sato: premium Shochu from Kyushu.

When it comes to Japanese alcohol, there is a lot of confusion about the use of the term sake. Sake in Japanese is a generic term that designates alcohol and does not refer to Japanese rice wine in particular. In Japan, rice wine is called nihonshu which means Japanese alcohol. Japan also traditionally distills alcohol from various fermented starches in ways similar to the one used to make vodka. The product of this distillation is called shochu (lit. burned alcohol) and it has, in the last few years, taken a growing place in Japan’s drinking habits.

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What food to enjoy while travelling in Japan

Quick sit down shops called yatai (photo by Justin C.)

Quick sit down shops called yatai (photo by Justin C.)

Travel has historically been difficult in Japan. In medieval times, one had to request a special travel permit from the governing authorities to be able to travel. Although travel was limited, snack shops for hungry travelers was an unmistakable part of the premodern landscape. Today this tradition endures. Japanese people can travel freely, yet they most often take very little time off work. In order to make the best out of a short vacation, Japanese tourists will take many pictures of their trip and purchase local food that can be eaten on the spot or at a later time. In this way, tourism and food are inextricably tied to each other in Japanese culture. While travelling in Japan, it is worthwhile to try to discover the different regional foods available.

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