5 essential Japanese table manners

Dinner at a sushi restaurant in Ginza, Tokyo,

Do you you really want to disappoint this guy? (photo by Joe deSousa)

 

The self-proclaimed aficionado parked at the sushi bar adds more wasabi to his little soya sauce bowl turning the mixture into sickly green mud. He then drops a piece of sushi in the mixture. I see the delicate construction brake apart as the rice soaks up more and more of the sauce. The sushi chef, neck veins twitching, his expression frozen in an impossible display of self-control, as he watches his guest with a smile. Sushi and other imported Japanese foods have gained much popularity in recent years. Discovering new food horizons is more than just sampling the exotic, it is also respecting the culture around which it developed. The best strategy to do so is to quietly observe Japanese people around the table learning from your own mistakes. For the less fortunate, here are a few useful pointers in order to not offend a Japanese host.

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How to avoid food culture shock in Japan

Grilled chicken breast cartilage (photo by 挪威 企鵝)

Grilled chicken breast cartilage (photo by 挪威 企鵝)

Out the window, sparsely populated luscious green mountains and valleys streamed by giving the impression we had left Japan.

“Do you like meat,” asked Yasu my Japanese friend who was driving.

“I love meat. There isn’t much I can’t eat,” I boasted remembering my breakfast of smelly natto fermented soybeans.

We soon arrived at a small shop in the countryside. The shop, a Japanese owned Chinese restaurant, was a local institution serving the Kubokawa pork that was so famous in the region. We seated ourselves at a Japanese table so close to the ground I could barely fold my legs under it.

“Give us two full set menus and some of the raw as well,” ordered Yasu.

The waitress balanced a flat iron griddle on top of a portable gas burner. Although my mouth had been salivating at the idea of eating grilled pork chops, I froze when I saw the food coming out of the kitchen. The dark brown liver was sliced sashimi style and served over a salty citrus sauce. The honeycomb intestine was also served raw with a spicy sesame oil. On the grill, sizzled a sectioned heart, curly intestine and unidentifiable fat coated organ meat. Food culture shock is real. Here is what to expect when eating out in Japan.

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Understanding the Japanese Izakaya

Neighborhood izakaya (photo by Fabian Reus)

Neighborhood izakaya (photo by Fabian Reus)

Japanese cuisine first went global when sushi shops spread throughout the urban dining landscape. Today, ramen shops are rapidly taking over the restaurant scene of large cities across the world. The next big thing to come out of Japan is the izakaya. Izakaya is spelled 居酒屋 in Japanese which translates to sake shop where you can settle yourself. The first izakayas were nothing more than extensions to sake shop where people could sit down and drink the sake they had purchased. As drinking always involves some eating in Japan, these places soon became as renowned for their food rather than their drinks. Izakayas or aka chochinas they are sometimes referred to by the red lantern that hang outside the entrance, are an ubiquitous part of Japanese culture that needs to be understood in its Japanese context.

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Live food tastes better in Japan

Live octopus ready to be eaten (photo by Alice Cai)

Live octopus ready to be eaten (photo by Alice Cai)

The first time I ordered odori ebi, dancing shrimp, in a Japanese restaurant, I was not too sure what to expect. The order came as four pieces of sushi topped with prawn that whipped their tails like they were trying to swim away. This had not been the first time I had dealt with freshly caught seafood as people outside of Japan also enjoy live boiled lobster and freshly chucked oysters. However, Japanese cuisine takes it one step further when it serves sea urchins, octopus and sashimi fish so fresh they still move. In reality, this so-called live seafood is still moving only because it is is animated by reflexes. These dishes will disgust many foreign diners, yet, they are a real treat in Japan and are served only in the best restaurants. Why do people in Japan come to enjoy their seafood so fresh that it is still moves?

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Making foreign foods Japanese

Cake shop display in Japan (photo by Janine Cheung)

Cake shop display in Japan (photo by Janine Cheung)

During its two hundred years of isolation, Japan pursued a policy that attempted to prevent foreign political and cultural ideas to penetrate the country. The goal was foremost to thwart the growing influence of the Catholic church by effectively cutting Japan off from the rest of the world. The law stated that Japanese leaving the country as well as foreigners entering Japan would be punished by death. This uncompromising edict did not stop the outside world from seeping into Japanese culture. As an island nation, Japan might at first glance appear to be a reclusive country with a culture very different from its immediate neighbor. However, the transmission of new cultural elements such as cuisine rarely respects national boundaries. In turn, these new crops or dishes were adapted to a new ecological and cultural environment. In the case of Japan, these transformations might not appear evident, as they became over time an integral part of the culinary culture. If we take a closer look at Japan’s cuisine, we will quickly realize that although these outside forces are far from obvious, they still manage to permeate the country’s culinary culture.

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Learn how to eat sushi the Japanese way

Otoro sushi fatty tuna (photo by Justin Choi)

Otoro or fatty tuna sushi (photo by Justin Choi)

In recent years, sushi has gained tremendous popularity around the World. As a result of this global success, sushi has come to mean different things depending on where it is eaten. For example, sushi in Japan is different from sushi in California. At its most basic definition, sushi is seasoned rice with raw fish, yet, to better understand sushi we need to take a closer look at its history. The precursor of sushi, nare-zushi, was first developed in East Asia to preserve fish. The fish would ferment between layers of cooked rice. The rice would be then discarded giving the fish a characteristic sour taste. With the elaboration of better forms of transportation and refrigeration, Edo period food stalls replaced fermented fish with raw fish served on vinegary rice called edo-mae sushi. Continue reading

Why is katsuo tataki better in Kochi

Fresh raw and seared tataki (photo by author)

Fresh raw and seared tataki (photo by author)

When I first came to Japan, I lived in a Tokyo shared house with a small kitchen which made cooking difficult. Most of my meals were either eaten out or bought already made at the local grocery store. Japan had a lot of interesting foods, and I wanted to try them all. Not being able yet to read Japanese, I one day bought what looked like seared tuna. The fish, which was in fact katsuo, was served with green onions and tasted quite fishy. In order to avoid this mistake, I made a point to tell tuna and katsuo apart from that day on. Years later, on a visit to Kochi, my friends reintroduced me to katsuo tataki. I tried it with some reticence but to my surprise it was delicious. Why was Kochi’s katsuo so delicious when Tokyo’s was not?

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